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Posts Tagged ‘Custody’

When interfaith parents divorce, religion of the children can often become a contested issue, even if during the marriage they had agreed on how to raise the children.

The issue can be further complicated when one parent converted to the religion of the other spouse before or during the marriage, but then wants to revert back to a previous religion after the marriage—and convert the children as well.

How courts handle the issue, if it is brought before them, can be a delicate balance of separation of church and state while respecting each person’s right to freedom of religion. (more…)

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A mother must spend 10 days in jail for signing her son up for a baseball league using his stepfather’s last name instead of that of his biological dad, the Alabama Court of Appeals ruled.

Lisa Preston was required to have her son use the last name of her former husband, Matthew Saab, when playing sports, according to the parties 2005 divorce decree, but in 2008 she did not use the Saab last name when she registered the 13-year-old.  She claimed it was the boy’s choice. But as we all know, children can be influenced. (more…)

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A divorced mother won a battle that allows her to keep her children in Missouri after her ex-husband moved from the Show-Me state to Israel, ruled the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals.

Tamar Barzilay says in the court documents that when she took their children on a vacation to Israel in summer 2006, her ex, Sagi, who had moved to Israel six months prior, under a year after their January 2005 divorce, forced her to sign documents agreeing to move permanently with the children to Israel by August 2009.  She signed, but said she never had any intention of complying. (more…)

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A new bill under consideration by the Tennessee State Legislature would evenly split parenting time between divorcing parents with exceptions only being made when one parent can prove the other is completely unfit, or the parents otherwise agree to their own parenting-time schedule.

It must be noted that many other articles on the ‘net refer to “custody” vs “parenting time.”  These phrases are not interchangeable.  The bill before the Tennessee legislature is about equal parenting time, not joint legal custody.  Yes there is a big difference. (more…)

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